This is what Ryan Murphy of AHS reveals on Twisty the clown:
“[…] It’s heart-stopping what he does. I’m worried. I’m worried that people are going to have cardiac arrests… The clown’s intro in the first episode is … even I was terrified of it. It’s brutal. Two crew members told me they have had nightmares about this clown since we started shooting and they’re not even scared of clowns. I think he’s pretty extraordinary because, when you see why he’s a clown and why he’s wearing the mask … just you wait.”

John Caroll Lynch (who plays Twisty) adds:
“His actions are horrific, but his motives are really strangely, oddly pure. And that’s what is most human and most disturbing about it.” 

SOURCE

I’m srsly wondering if anybody else is as ridiculously excited as I am.

This is what Ryan Murphy of AHS reveals on Twisty the clown:
“[…] It’s heart-stopping what he does. I’m worried. I’m worried that people are going to have cardiac arrests… The clown’s intro in the first episode is … even I was terrified of it. It’s brutal. Two crew members told me they have had nightmares about this clown since we started shooting and they’re not even scared of clowns. I think he’s pretty extraordinary because, when you see why he’s a clown and why he’s wearing the mask … just you wait.”

John Caroll Lynch (who plays Twisty) adds:
“His actions are horrific, but his motives are really strangely, oddly pure. And that’s what is most human and most disturbing about it.”

SOURCE

I’m srsly wondering if anybody else is as ridiculously excited as I am.

psychedel1c-princess said: I like you, you seem like an excellent human being and you have a lovely sense of humor! Particularly in dealing with rude, troublesome anons

Oh thank you!! That’s really sweet. Haha, yes but luckily I rarely have to deal with harsh messages cause most of my followers are super sweet and what I would call the good kind of weird :))

"Parure en or et mosaïques, avec son écrin. Composée d’un collier, d’une paire de bracelets et de boucles d’oreilles ; offert par Napoléon Ier à l’archiduchesse Marie-Louise comme présent de mariage le 28 février 1810 (Louvre)"

A set of necklace, 2 bracelets, earrings and obviously a comb (even though not mentioned in the original description). Given to archduchess Marie-Louise of Austria by Napoleon Bonaparte as a wedding gift on February 28, 1810. 

SOURCE

"Parure en or et mosaïques, avec son écrin. Composée d’un collier, d’une paire de bracelets et de boucles d’oreilles ; offert par Napoléon Ier à l’archiduchesse Marie-Louise comme présent de mariage le 28 février 1810 (Louvre)"

A set of necklace, 2 bracelets, earrings and obviously a comb (even though not mentioned in the original description). Given to archduchess Marie-Louise of Austria by Napoleon Bonaparte as a wedding gift on February 28, 1810.

SOURCE

The wonderful invalid

Leonard Trask (June 30, 1805 – April 13, 1861)[1][2] was an American who suffered from a “contortion of neck and spine” during his late 20s after an accident while horse riding, which led to Trask becoming a medical curiosity. After numerous attempts at a cure, several further accidents resulting from his condition, and a loss of employment and mobility, Trask (by then earning small amounts of money as a curiosity) published an account of his condition which further increased his renown. His condition remained unsolved upon his death, but he was subsequently diagnosed post mortem with ankylosing spondylitis (AS).

SOURCE

The Fiji mermaid (also Feejee mermaid) was an object comprising the torso and head of a juvenile monkey sewn to the back half of a fish. It was a common feature of sideshows, where it was presented as the mummified body of a creature that was supposedly half mammal and half fish, a version of a mermaid. The original object was exhibited by P. T. Barnum from 1842 until the 1860s when it was destroyed in a fire. The original had fish scales with animal hair superimposed on its body with pendulous breasts on its chest. The mouth was wide open with its teeth bared. The right hand was against the right cheek, and the left tucked under its lower left jaw. Several replicas and variations have also been made and exhibited under similar names and pretexts.

SOURCE

(The photo shows a specimen from the International Cryptozoology Museum, Portland.)

The Fiji mermaid (also Feejee mermaid) was an object comprising the torso and head of a juvenile monkey sewn to the back half of a fish. It was a common feature of sideshows, where it was presented as the mummified body of a creature that was supposedly half mammal and half fish, a version of a mermaid. The original object was exhibited by P. T. Barnum from 1842 until the 1860s when it was destroyed in a fire. The original had fish scales with animal hair superimposed on its body with pendulous breasts on its chest. The mouth was wide open with its teeth bared. The right hand was against the right cheek, and the left tucked under its lower left jaw. Several replicas and variations have also been made and exhibited under similar names and pretexts.

SOURCE

(The photo shows a specimen from the International Cryptozoology Museum, Portland.)

Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS), is the experience of complex visual hallucinations in a person with partial or severe blindness. First described by Charles Bonnet in 1760, it was first introduced into English-speaking psychiatry in 1982.

Sufferers, who are mentally healthy people with often significant visual loss, have vivid, complex recurrent visual hallucinations (fictive visual percepts). One characteristic of these hallucinations is that they usually are “lilliputian” (hallucinations in which the characters or objects are smaller than normal). The most common hallucination is of faces or cartoons.
_________________________________

I found this excerpt of a psychological dissertation on the topic in German. (I tried my best to give a decent translation): 

”[…] Sometimes hallucinations would move along with the movement of the eyes. Most patients hallucinate with open eyes only. Some would experience objects floating in the air or projected onto the walls. Others report the objects would blend in well with the surroundings (like an unreal person sitting in a real chair). Patients hallucinating with eyes closed would experience images in the dark space behind their eyelids. […]”

( German original: “Manchmal bewegte sich die Halluzination gemeinsam mit den Bewegungen der Augen. Die meisten Patienten halluzinierten nur mit offenen Augen. Einige nahmen halluzinierte Objekte als durch die Luft schwebend wahr oder als an die Wand oder die Decke projeziert. Andere berichteten, dass die Objekte sich gut in die Umgebung eingefügt hatten (z.B. eine nicht reale Person in einem realen Sessel sitzend). Patienten, die mit geschlossenen Augen halluzinierten, nahmen die Halluzinationen in dem dunklen subjektiven Raum hinter den Augenlidern wahr. (…)”)



SOURCE 1

SOURCE 2

Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS), is the experience of complex visual hallucinations in a person with partial or severe blindness. First described by Charles Bonnet in 1760, it was first introduced into English-speaking psychiatry in 1982.

Sufferers, who are mentally healthy people with often significant visual loss, have vivid, complex recurrent visual hallucinations (fictive visual percepts). One characteristic of these hallucinations is that they usually are “lilliputian” (hallucinations in which the characters or objects are smaller than normal). The most common hallucination is of faces or cartoons.
_________________________________

I found this excerpt of a psychological dissertation on the topic in German. (I tried my best to give a decent translation):

”[…] Sometimes hallucinations would move along with the movement of the eyes. Most patients hallucinate with open eyes only. Some would experience objects floating in the air or projected onto the walls. Others report the objects would blend in well with the surroundings (like an unreal person sitting in a real chair). Patients hallucinating with eyes closed would experience images in the dark space behind their eyelids. […]”

( German original: “Manchmal bewegte sich die Halluzination gemeinsam mit den Bewegungen der Augen. Die meisten Patienten halluzinierten nur mit offenen Augen. Einige nahmen halluzinierte Objekte als durch die Luft schwebend wahr oder als an die Wand oder die Decke projeziert. Andere berichteten, dass die Objekte sich gut in die Umgebung eingefügt hatten (z.B. eine nicht reale Person in einem realen Sessel sitzend). Patienten, die mit geschlossenen Augen halluzinierten, nahmen die Halluzinationen in dem dunklen subjektiven Raum hinter den Augenlidern wahr. (…)”)

SOURCE 1

SOURCE 2

unexplained-events:

This is what nightmares are made of

unexplained-events:

This is what nightmares are made of

Tags: lol nope

trying2bme4me said: I love your blog. I actually get properly excited when i see new posts :)

Aw thanks dear!! :)

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

Perfect.

(via sixpenceee)

Tags: photography